Boyhood, America in a Post- 9/11 World, and our Techno-Frenzied Future.

Last night, I had the pleasure of watching the new Richard Linklater film, Boyhood. Boyhood is unique among films in that it was shot over the course of 12 years. The film starts in an America that was still contending with the post-9/11 world and continues through to the modern day. Boyhood is full of nostalgia — the soundtrack is excellent — and you’re likely to hear lots of “oooohs” and “aaahs” and “I had one of those…” while you’re in the theatre, but that is really just the beginning.

Similar to how The Wonder Years captured the 1960s in a beautiful way for my parents’ generation, Boyhood does this for Millennials. There are many themes and motifs in this film that resonated with me. Here is my analysis of a few of them:

Economic hardship —  From paying bills to putting kids through college, our world is expensive. You may have wanted to be a musician, but sometimes you’re forced to put those ambitions aside to take care of your family, as it is necessary to pay the bills. (At SkillBridge, we have certainly provided supplemental income for hundreds of consultants, and it is our hope to continue doing this for many years to come.)

Forgiveness — Moving on is a trait that is undervalued. It is necessary to forgive to move forward. As we see in this film, Ethan Hawke’s character goes from being a 30-year-old bum to a 40-year-old family man. People shouldn’t be punished forever for decisions they make when they are young.

Personal growth — Not everyone makes the right decisions when they are young: Some people become single parents, others fail to study subjects that are relevant to the careers they want. These should all be considered learning experiences. You can go back to school to study the subject that interests you. You can raise your children to become fine people without a spouse. And you can pursue your passions.

America — Living in New York, I often forget about America’s natural beauty. In such a large place, people have differing opinions on politics, religion, etc. This diversity of opinions, whether we agree with them or not, is what makes America interesting and sustainable in the long-run. The American Dream is still alive, and with hard work and dedication, it can still be achieved.

Family — Families grow, families shrink, and the dynamics of the American family in particular is changing. As we see through Patricia Arquette’s character and her significant relationships with three different men — none of which works out for her in the long run — relationships have become more transient, but that doesn’t mean they can’t be fulfilling.

Immigration — America has long been a land of immigrants. Those who work hard, succeed. It may not be easy, but it is possible. Nothing happens overnight. Life isn’t one big reality show.

Technology — For better or for worse, technology has grown to be an essential part of our lives. In some places within America, technology still lags. You needn’t be tethered to your iPhone for six hours per day, and there is still quite a bit of beauty in the world, but technology is improving so rapidly that we forget to make time for nature and the other wonderful things that our world offers us. Let us use technology for good, and not for evil.

Life is short — In one of the final scenes of this film, Patricia Arquette’s character starts to cry, as she realizes that she will now be an empty-nester, her kids grown up and moving out of her home. Of course Millennials tend to “return to the nest” at higher rates than previous generations, but this film really puts things in perspective. Enjoy your life, love the people who are close to you. Be thankful to your parents and the other adults who made you who you are.

If there’s one film you should see this summer — dare I say this year — it is Boyhood, as it encapsulates so many of the ethos that have guided our lives since the turn of the millennium.

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